Feminism & Happiness

Welcome. I'm Amanda (Mandy), 25, female, afro-latina, currently living in Texas. (temporally living in Perú again) This is my personal blog where I speak about feminism, racism, body positivity and happiness in general. Think of this as a healing space.

We all can

Who I Follow

(via curvellas)

thornsandwillows:

If you take a young man and woman and they both tell a stranger that they work in the same restaurant, it’s very likely that they will assume that the woman is the waitress, and the young man a cook.

But I thought a woman’s place was in the kitchen? Not when she’s being paid for it. I can’t believe it took me this long to realize the implication of this. A woman’s place is one of servitude.

(via positiveconnotation)

withinthepines:

Stop/End Mental Illness Stigma! Photo taken by Marcus Smith.

withinthepines:

Stop/End Mental Illness Stigma! Photo taken by Marcus Smith.

(via recoveryisbeautiful)

elizabitchtaylor:

If the point of the Big Bang Theory was to show that male nerds can be just as sexist as male jocks then well done I guess

(via feminismandpugsarelife)

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

queenkatiee:

louis2k9:

reginasmom:

how is he even still allowed to be on tv

Lindsay Lohan has starred in more than 27 movies, appeared in 8 different TV-shows, hosted Saturday Night Live five times, been nominated for 44 awards and won 22 of them. What has Perez done in his years of “fame”? Talked shit about celebrities online.

What a douche canoe

burn perez

(via madmaudlingoes)

Whites are drawn to Black culture because of the extraordinary quality of it, our aesthetic, our style. We set the styles. We are the trendsetters of America. America is known globally for its culture, which is Black.

They want to look like us, but they don’t want to be us. They don’t want to live in our skin. It’s kind of a cultural voyeurism. It allows white people to safely tour Blackness without being subjected to the reality of being Black.

Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, Jet Magazine Jun 25, 2001

(via bitteroreo)

the motherfucking tea 

(via feelonious)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

(via angryshortfemme)

artbymegs:

I feel like this should be pretty self-explanatory. I’m drawing these for a zine at my college (and they have a tumblr! lips-appstate.tumblr.com!), but submissions are due today, so they’re a bit more rushed than I would have liked.

I tried to be inclusive and not-shitty. Hopefully I succeeded at that. There are more of these I’d like to draw, but like I said, time limitations :P

(via cuteequeer)

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.



On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter.

That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via delicatedad)

When a man succeeds in a devalued (because of its association with women) field, he legitimizes it in popular opinion.

(via survivorsuperhero)

Carol Plum-Ucci also

And many of these books are much better written and have more literary merit

(via fromonesurvivortoanother)

(via crybabydaffodil)

I have been astonished by hearing individuals who inherited wealth in childhood warn against sharing resources because people needing help should work for money in order to appreciate its value. Inherited wealth and/or substantial material resources are rarely talked about in the mass media because those who receive it do not wish to validate the idea that money received that is not a reward for hard work is beneficial. Their acceptance and use of this money to strengthen their economic self-sufficiency exposes the reality that working hard is rarely the means by which enough of us can gain enough access to material resources to become wealthy. One of the ironies of the culture of greed is that the people who profit the most from earnings they have not worked to attain are the most eager to insist that the poor and working classes can only value material resources attained through hard work. Of course, they are merely establishing a belief system that protects their class interests and lessens their accountability to those who are without privilege.
bell hooks in All About Love: New Visions (via ethiopienne)

(via lowkeyshe)

rusig:

"I don’t think girls should—"

image

(via comfemgem)